Archive for August, 2018

To Associate or To Not Associate?

Monday, August 27th, 2018

By Bryan Stimmler, Advisory Board Member

What a loaded question! We’ve all heard the horrors of associating, the long thankless hours, the loaded schedules, lack of help/mentorship, etc. But have you heard any of the good stories?

Let’s start at the beginning here. First, do you know what you want out of the next three years? The next one year? The next month? That is where you need to start. Really sit down and analyze what you want to accomplish. “I want to get my speed up” is not an analysis. It’s repeating a sentence you’ve heard someone else say. What are your goals for your time in this profession? Be honest here. You can accept the stresses of ownership and working for yourself and take that path. If you value time over money, associating can be a beautiful thing. If you don’t want to deal with management, crunching numbers, or dealing with team members, that is OK. Just understand what you want in your future, because you alone control your future.

And here’s the silver lining: YOU CAN ALWAYS CHANGE!

So, you know what you want now. You can learn A LOT from being an associate. Some of this is dependent on you, some on your owner doc. Working in someone else’s office affords you a mentor, so choose wisely. You can sit back and learn systems, scheduling, billing, all of the things, if you take the opportunity. This is immensely helpful if you plan on opening your own office in the future. You can learn at your own pace, and choose what you want to learn as you get your feet wet. You may find you love surgery. Great! Go after that surgery CE and use this situation as practice.

Here’s a little-spoke-of aspect of associateship you may not have heard. You can learn all of the things you DON’T want to do. This is crazy valuable. Take a step back and look at all of the things that annoy you, that don’t work, that cause frustration to not only yourself but the team as well. Write them down, think about how they could be changed, altered, or improved. You now have a blueprint for how you would like to set your own office up.

Whatever path you choose, choose wisely, and do it with intent.

Dr. Bryan Stimmler (002)

 

Dr. Stimmler graduated in 2009 from the University of Southern California School of Dentistry.  After completing residency and practicing as an associate, he started a private practice in Brooklyn, NY which focuses on complete care and cosmetic dentistry.

3 Types of Problem Patients Who Are Actually Hurting Your Practice

Monday, August 13th, 2018

By Sally McKenzie, CEO of McKenzie Management

Attracting and keeping patients is a vital part of any dentist’s success. It doesn’t matter how talented you are clinically if you don’t have any patients to treat. To meet your financial goals, you must build a strong base of loyal patients—but you also need to attract the right kind of patients.

Unfortunately, there are some patients who actually hurt your practice. Here are three types of patients who often end up doing more harm than good, and the changes you can make to help them become the type of patients every dentist wants in their practice.

1. Patients who are always late on their payments. Patients accept treatment, then forget they actually need to pay. They usually pay eventually, but only after team members spend valuable time sending reminders and calling them on the phone.

How can you get patients to start paying on time? First, establish a clear financial policy. When patients make an appointment, make sure they understand when payment is expected. Don’t leave any room for confusion. I also recommend offering third party financing from a company like CareCredit. This enables patients to pay in small chunks each month, making the cost of dentistry much more manageable. You get paid on time, and patients are also more likely to go forward with treatment they otherwise couldn’t afford.

2. Patients who don’t value the dentistry you provide. When patients don’t value dentistry, they don’t make it a priority. So if something else comes up that conflicts with their scheduled appointment time, they don’t feel bad about canceling at the last minute or simply not showing up at all. These broken appointments bring chaos to your day and often keep you from meeting production goals.

Spend time educating patients about the value of the services you provide. This education can come in the form of images from an intraoral camera, radiographs, videos and even brochures. Make sure patients understand why maintaining their oral health is important to their overall health, and the possible consequences of not going forward with recommended treatment. I also suggest confirming with patients two days ahead of their visit, giving you time to fill open slots if they have to cancel.

3. Patients who show up once never to be seen again. Patients come in for their new patient appointment, you think the visit goes great, but you never hear anything from the patient again—and you have no idea why. Patients don’t come back simply because they didn’t have a good experience. Once patients are in the chair, focus on building a rapport. Ask them about their families, their jobs and their oral health goals.

Patients are the lifeblood of your practice, but sometimes they can actually cost you money and create extra stress. Making the necessary changes will help turn these problem patients into the loyal patients your practice needs to thrive.

Sally

 

Sally McKenzie is CEO of McKenzie Management, www.mckenziemgmt.com, a full-service, nationwide dental practice management company. Contact her directly at 877-777-6151 or email sallymck@mckenziemgmt.com.