Archive for April, 2016

Careers with Purpose in the Beautiful Great Plains

Friday, April 29th, 2016

IHS_DEN_Blog_614x215_ScottsBluffNB_APR_NewDentistIf stress, traffic and high living expenses are getting you down, consider a career move to the Great Plains.

The Indian Health Service (IHS) offers dental health professionals extraordinary opportunities to provide comprehensive care to American Indians and Alaska Natives in hospitals, clinics and outreach programs throughout the Great Plains Area, which covers North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska and Iowa.

The Great Plains Area Office in Aberdeen, SD, works in conjunction with its 19 Indian Health Service Units and Tribal-managed Service Units to provide health care to approximately 122,000 Native Americans in the four-state Area. Area service units include seven hospitals, eight health centers, and several smaller health stations and satellite clinics.

The dedicated providers at the IHS Division of Oral Health enjoy a work-life balance that offers ample time for recreational pursuits. Known for its awe-inspiring natural attractions and landmarks, the Great Plains Area boasts world-class fishing, hiking, hunting, skiing and more.

And the financial incentives can’t be beat. As an IHS clinician, you’re eligible to apply for up to $20,000 a year in loan repayment to fund your qualified health profession education loans.

You can choose from three distinct career paths — working in the civil service, in a Tribal/Urban Indian Program, or as an officer with the US Public Health Service (USPHS) Commissioned Corps.

Applicants are subject to a pre-employment background check, including a fingerprint analysis, and must be US citizens. Male applicants must be registered for the selective service. Veterans and American Indians and Alaska Natives are encouraged to apply and receive hiring preference.

Applicants for civil service and USPHS Commissioned Corps positions must submit their materials through www.usajobs.gov. Tribal hire applicants must apply directly through the Tribe with whom they are seeking employment.

Professionally rewarding and personally fulfilling — explore a world of opportunities at ihs.gov/dentistry or contact a recruiter and upload a resume here. Applicants must be U.S. citizens.

The policy of IHS is to provide absolute preference to qualified Indian applicants and employees who are suitable for federal employment in filling vacancies in the IHS. IHS is an equal opportunity employer.

INDIAN HEALTH CAREERS — Opportunity. Adventure. Purpose.

Encrypting Your Patient Identity and Health Information

Friday, April 15th, 2016

Guest post by Mark Hollis, CEO of MacPractice

In 2015 alone, the identity and health information of 35% of Americans was exposed – more than 111 Million patient records. More and more, dentists and patients are becoming aware that reported breaches like this effect them directly and can have grave consequences. If you think about it, most of us know someone who has had their personal information compromised and had to spend years recovering from a loss of their identity. Your patient’s identity theft can results in:

Fraudulent charges

Empty bank account

Lost home

Stolen Social Security benefits

Bad credit

Emotional stress, divorce, loss of business, etc.

Health care providers are required by HIPAA to protect EPHI with AES encryption ‘at rest’ on the server and backups, and on a network in the office (and between offices and over the Internet if that applies). The theft and sale of EPHI (Electronic Protected Health Information) is lucrative for thousands of hackers in places like Iran, Russia and China. No one can stop the attempts, but dentists can, at a minimum, use dental software with built-in encryption that makes EPHI indecipherable to a hacker or burglar.

A startling reality is that vendors are NOT required to provide encryption in their software. Other than MacPractice, NONE of the other leading dental vendors provide encryption in their software.

Patients are starting to ask dentists how their data is protected before providing it. In a recent survey, 50% of patients said they would leave their doctor if they were notified their data was exposed, as is required by HIPAA of all doctors who do not encrypt EPHI as well as their database password. In addition, HIPAA and States can assess millions of dollars in fines for non-compliance. This is truly a national emergency.

Encrypted software helps you avoid millions in fines for non-compliance, and qualifies you for HIPAA’s Safe Harbor. In the event of a breach, Safe Harbor can exempt you from having to send first class mail to all who are affected, notify HHS and prominent media, post a notice on your home page, and more. Practices that do not encrypt their patients’ data and report a breach rarely recover.

MacPractice encourages you to learn more about this important topic and how built-in encryption can protect you and your practice. You can download our free whitepaper, register for our encryption webinar and subscribe to our HIPAA web resource page.

MarkHollis_headshot_2014

 

For more than 30 years, Mark has been helping doctors to run their practices more efficiently, first as a practice management consultant and now as CEO of MacPractice – the leading software for doctors who prefer Apple technology. Mark has spoken at seminars, trade shows, dental schools and more than 500 small business events at Apple locations. He is an established and well-respected leader on Cloud computing, dental and medical technology and Electronic Health Records.

He can be reached at markhollis@macpractice.com